YW 91 – The Longest Distance with David Scott

YW 91 – The Longest Distance with David Scott

Jason invites David Scott on the Young Wealth show to talk about his book The Longest Distance. David’s book teaches others about the importance of being in the present and finding happiness within. David and Jason talk about some of the key things you can learn from the book, how it applies to everyday life, and why it’s a story that almost anybody can relate to. The Longest Distance has won the Living Now Book Awards and has been highly reviewed on Amazon as a very inspiring book to reread again and again.

 

Key Takeaways:

1:40 – What is the HEAD Foundation?
6:05 – What’s The Longest Distance about?
10:05 – Even though the book is fiction, there are some underlining truths to the stories.
14:45 – Does materialism really matter?
18:00 – If you’re trying to be the best person you can be, it can be achieved in a number of different ways.
21:00 – Final thoughts? Whatever is going on in your life, make sure you’re present with it.

Tweetables:

“He gets shaken by a tragedy in the beginning, which often is what’s required to set us on a new path.”  

“By using every stumbling block as a stepping stone, you imagine an ascension of greater understanding, knowing, and being.”

 

Mentioned In This Episode:
http://www.authordavidscott.com/
@DScottWrites

 

Transcript

Jason Hartman:
It’s my pleasure to welcome David Scott to the show. He is managing director of the HEAD Foundation and the founder of Unite Education and the author of a very interesting novel dealing with some of the questions we have probably all faced in our life at one time or another and we’re probably continuing to face and it is entitled The Longest Distance and it’s a pleasure to have him coming us today from beautiful Singapore. David, welcome, how are you?

David Scott:
Jason, thank you. I’m happy to be here and doing fine. Early here in Singapore, but off to a good start.

Jason:
What time is early?

David:
It’s slight after 4am here on Friday.

Jason:
Well, thank you for getting up so early for us.

David:
It’s certainty my pleasure.

Jason:
Tell us first of all before we dive into the book. What is the HEAD Foundation and Unite Education?

David:
Well, the HEAD foundation is an education think tank which focuses on education policy and practice and leadership development, specifically here in Asia and we essentially look at the role that education plays in societal development and progress and sustainability.

Jason:
Yeah, so that’s interesting. Asia seems to have very good education, at least at the grade school level. The US is always famous for it’s great universities and I don’t know even that’s kind of debatable to tell you the truth, but that’s another issue. If it’s not debate, at least it’s overpriced, massively overpriced in the US, but that’s another issue. So, what’s going on Asia with education? I’m just curious.

David:
Well, we’re going through a transformation, you know, I actually have written about this most recently in the Huffington Post as a contributor, but there’s..

Jason:
I saw that article by the way.

David:
Then you may have seen, when comparing and addressing Asia versus let’s say in this case the US education system. I mean, it’s really more, one, the Asian education system are focusing much more on IQ development let’s call it and the US and other Western nations a bit more on the EQ side and I think it’s, but what we’re seeing is each is peering through the fence at the other. I mean, Asia is looking to become much more EQ intelligent.

Jason:
When you say EQ, are you talking about emotional intelligence?

David:
Yeah, but I’m talking about Jason in a broader sense. Merely beyond just compassion, tolerance, understanding, loving, and empathy, but really in terms of the development of those qualities that allow us to relate better to one another. Collaboration, communication, creativity, problem solving, critical thinking, and the US is still a leader in that regard surprisingly to some, but Asia is looking to close that gap. So, on the international standardize exams PESA and others, I mean, the Asian students are performing better, but I think that’s more the nature of the, they’re much more teacher centered and the rigor of their education system.

Jason:
And so HEAD, the HEAD foundation, is that dealing with education?

David:
Yes, we are actually, we’re looking at – we do research and we’re influencing policy hopefully in education reform across Asia and then specifically get involved in projects that help to develop among other key topic areas – leadership and innovation and entrepreneurship through education.

Jason:
Okay, good. I assume you’re an American, right?

David:
I am. I was born in, let’s see, Philadelphia area, raised in the East Coast and spent about 20 years in California. Yes, very much America. I imagine you are after visiting 70 odd number countries. I’m global more than I am merely American these days.

Jason:
I think travel is so important, it just opens up our eyes and gives us preservative and if you want world peace, travel some other places and understand the people and it’s unlikely you’re going to go to war with people you understand and make connections with.

David:
But isn’t it true though, Jason, in life though. I mean, really, education, we can have education in formal and informal manner with every breath we take and ultimately it’s through the experiences that it’s grounded it in a true knowing.

Jason:
Tell me what you mean by that.

David:
Well, essentially there’s thinking and there’s believing and there’s knowing. I mean, thinking is obviously much more head centered activity, but to truly get to know someone, we must have the opportunity to be able to experience first hand the interactions, the relationships in life, because it’s through the relationship with ourselves, with a higher self of one believes and such, and with one another that we find out more about who we are in truth and who we are interacting with the other in truth.

Jason:
Yeah, good. Well, that really is a great segue to talk about The Longest Distance. So, this is a novel that you wrote, by the way it has excellent reviews on Amazon, and you say it’s part love story, part adventure/mystery, part travel guide for the soul, and it’s a meditation in traveling from our heads to our hearts and an awakening to what lies within, so tell us about it.

David:
Well, again, and hopefully it’s a journey that many can relate to. I know it was a blessing in its unfolding with my writing of it, but it’s essentially one character. A character by name of Jeremy Braddock who essentially sets off, he gets shaken and awaken by a tragedy in the beginning, which often is what’s required to kind of set us on a new path and hopefully a higher one and he gets about through the course of his life traveling from place to place. Each chapter takes you to a different part of the world and he begins to piece together that sort of allusiveness of what is love really, what is life about really, what is the truth of oneself really, and then I won’t ruin the ending or be a spoiler of any kind, but ultimately he’s on this journey, this treasure hunt for that allusive thing called happiness.

Jason:
So, what did he find along the way and how many chapters, how many countries is really what I’m asking.

David:
So, there’s 14 chapters. Beginning in Africa and taking you all the way through to China and Dubai and Italy and US and a number of stops in between, but ultimately what he finds is that it really is through the relationship. I would call him a serial conservationist. I mean, he’s in constant…

Jason:
I love that.

David:
He’s in constant check within himself and with a higher self that kind of tunes in through various masters. There are literally 30 different masters that come popping into the book in some shape or form whether it’s through a timely message or a melody or the different ways in which we receive information if we are open to it and if we are present in the moment and when I say masters, it could be everything from Confucius to Michael Angelo to Voltaire to a host of others in between that just bring timely messages through others, because I do believe is where we get our information is through one another.

Jason:
Was it necessary for the character to travel to have these discoveries? I mean, couldn’t Jeremy Braddock be a serial conservationist in Singapore or Scottsdale, Arizona where I live for example?

David:
Jason, it’s a wonderful question and I think that’s part of the evolution of this particular character’s process is, you know, he’s running all over the world looking for the answer and ultimately it kind of moves into maybe a conversation we have about the importance of medication or contemplation or moving into that serene place, because it doesn’t not require that one is traversing the planet for the answers, because the answers really are derived more so from within and it’s just, I would say, that the supporting actors and actresses in our lives are the others that help to kind of, let’s just say spawn that thinking and open those passage ways, but yes, it’s something that can only really be found when we go to the love within the love or go to the deeper sides of ourselves.

Jason:
Tell us about some of the discoveries and how the character came to discover them and, by the way, is this character really your proxy self? Is it your journey?

David:
You know, my experience has been and you would have to ask other authors, but my experience in writing, this is my first book of fiction, is that ultimately there is certain body of truth and real-life experiences that goes into any decent book of fiction, because it has to be grounded in something that we can speak of and we can only really, truly, speak of it from our own knowing and then that knowing comes from our experiences. So, yes, there is a basis of truth in it, but for example as you start chapter when we’re riding on Africa, there are elements of that stories in there that are true, but where you can take it through your imagination is really up to you. So, yes. There is a basis of truth in it, but where we go with it, as an author, I’ve found it’s kind of like setting sail, but allowing the water and wind currents to take you where you need to go.

Jason:
Right, right. Okay, let’s go through some of these lessons and learnings and see how, you know, all the people listening can apply this to their own lives possibly. What does the character learn and how does he learn it?

David:
Yeah, I would say one of them is the importance in being present in the moment, because again, this is, you know, I think he learns that life is a series of now moments that we’re in the now until the next now until the next now moment and that to the degree that we can live in the present, we get the fullness of whatever is available to us, whether it’s through our deeper self or whether it’s through those around us, we get more of the fullness of life and I believe have less regrets later on in life about maybe missing this moment or that moment, because of worries, doubts, fears, and uncertainties, let’s call all of those negative energies that can pervade usually through the mind and then often times through the emotions, but when we get to the deeper intelligent heart, you know, there’s a sort of golden opportunity for us there.

Jason:
I had Dan Millman on the show recently and I’m sure you’re familiar with his great work, The Way of The Peaceful Warrior and many other books and I asked him, David, if he had one piece of advice for people listening, what would it be? He simply said, be here now.

David:
And that’s it. You know what, Daniel is obviously brilliant in that regard, because being here now. There’s so much that goes into that and if you are in here now and then ultimately what I would expand and say therefore in the truth of the moment, I believe you will find loving, you will find joy, you will find peace, you will find happiness, you will find all of those positive opportunity and elements and characteristics that life offers us once you move into that now moment. It’s in the absence of that that I think we’re constantly chasing.

Jason:
So, if everybody believes that it is important to be in the now, to be present, if you will, any advice as to how to get there? I mean, what did the character learn about how to be in the now and why to be in the now?

David:
Again, I think the character is very much like each of is in that it’s through the trials of tribulations that he kind of peels back the layers of what he is not and gets more toward what he is and why he is here. I think it was Rumi the ancient Persian poet and mysticist who once said and I’m paraphrasing, if there is one thing you must never forget to do, you know, if you do this there’s really nothing much to worry about, but in the absence of that, you could create to do all else and forget this, but you will however essentially accomplished nothing in life and I think he’s speaking to that as well.

You know, the being in the present moment and finding that deeper loving and when I say loving, it’s not necessarily in the emotional that we tend to attribute that to, but that deeper loving, which is also attributed to a deeper knowing and understanding of who I am, why I’m here, and then getting on that upon that path of, okay, let’s get upon a more purposeful life. I mean, I imagine from the other subject matter that you cover, I mean, it’s very similar to what’s going on with – I’m about to write an article for CEO magazine of all places where we’re talking about how to redefine success and then ultimately, you know, does matter matter any more as oppose to things that might matter more.

Jason:
Does matter matter anymore. Tell us what you mean by that. Are you just talking about materialism or what do you mean?

David:
Yeah, in that particular case, yes. It’s sort of like materialism still matters, but does it matter as much, because there are so many, here in Asia as well as back in the states and Europe that have an all metrics that society generally identify with success on a financial terms there are extremely successful individuals, but there’s still some void in their lives because they’ve accomplished, they’ve created so much, it’s all much a weight lifter that spends all their time in the gym, but doesn’t develop other sides of themselves. So, I look to live my life, Jason, which it sounds like you do as well where, you know, I don’t look toward retirement. I balance both sides of the equation, striking a healthy balance between the quantity of life that I contribute and receive and the quality of life I live.

Jason:
Good point, good point. Okay, so being in the now, having that balance. How long does this journey take place? The Longest Distance.

David:
It’s over the course of, the book covers his adult years and takes you forward all the way, you know, sort of advance this character forward to his, the very latest years of his life, and so it’s constant process, Jason. So, you never really completely there. I mean, I have a spiritual teacher that calls it et cetera, just when you think you’re there..

Jason:
I love that et cetera. That’s what ride is. You know, the road to success is always under construction has Dennis Waitley used to say or maybe it was Zig Ziglar, I can’t remember. That’s certainty true and that’s a good point. We never really arrive. It’s like Cervantes, the journey is better than the end. Okay, tell us about some of the other lessons.

David:
Well, I think the other lessons he learns is humility is a very important one. So, when you think about some of the character traits and qualities that are collected along the way, you know, it’s certainty he gets, the way he gets lessons really is through a number of different forms. It could be a taxi driver conversation, it could be, there’s one gentleman by the name of Robert who is a homeless man that he ends in interacting with and then, of course, through the, you know, one is a wine connoisseur and a vineyard manager that talks about and relates sort of the expression, the experience with grapes and wine with life itself.

And so, so many different ways in which he gets schooled in a positive way and he learns about devotion and service. He learns through others about a compassion. He learns through others sort of understanding. He learns through others about what peace my look like and feel like. He learns about loving in a deeper sense. He learns about just a number of sort of, I call them key qualities that when woven together sort of the tapestry of the greater. The greater version of ourselves. I’m sure Jason you hear there’s those who follow over a religious doctrine and those who follow a more spiritual path and those that just go about every day life and don’t even realize that there are forming a tapestry of a greater version of themselves. Let’s just say the highest level of our goodness. That is it in a nutshell, you know, whether you’re following a religion or a spiritual practice or whether you’re just trying to be the best person you can be each day, I think it can be accomplished in a number of different ways.

Jason:
So, these all take place through living as a serial conversationist, as you put it, are there certain key moments where it’s like one conversation and then there’s this ah-ha moment or is it just kind of this constant iteration and then the ah-ha moment or maybe never an ah-ha moment, maybe just an et cetera.

David:
Well, it’s a great question. There is this constant iteration. Using every stumbling block as a stepping stone and you imagine an ascension of the pyramid of greater understanding, knowing, and being. So, along the way he’s picking up pieces, but the challenge in it is of course when we think know it all, then we will get tested and we will get tested in a greater way, so we are constantly tested to see, okay, you think you got that down, you think you know that, well just how anchored is that.

So, there are a couple ah-ha moments as you referenced and I won’t tell you where they take place, because I think it would be good for the reader to experience that themselves, but there is, I would say, there’s a building going on of a greater strength and understanding. I would call it the aura, building a new aura of awareness to understanding to responsibility to action. AURA. In this case it’s in our actions really that we demonstration that learning has turned into a knowing, has turned into an essence of our everyday being.

Jason:
Yeah, good stuff. David, give out your website and tell people where they can find out more about you.

David:
Well, certainty. Our website AuthorDavidScott.com. You can find us on Twitter @DscottWrites. I mentioned before a regular columnist these days for the Huffington Post and you can find the book on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, any of the ebook formats these days, and we just won an aware recently, which was a special aware for us with the Living Now Awards, which are new books out there that help to improve people’s lives. So, we’re pleased with that. It was a wonderful and very humble acknowledgment.

Jason:
Fantastic. Well Daivd Scott, any final thought you want to leave us with?

David:
You know Jason, I think we covered it. You know what, just make sure whatever is going on that you’re present with it and that you move into sort of the greatest version of yourselves and your loving. I mean, just it’s a more peaceful way. Look for grace and look for ease. The opposite is what we kind of see out there in the media these days and I think grace and ease is a lot more enjoyable path than through the force of it all.

Jason:
Very wise words. David Scott, thank you for joining us.

David:
Thank you Jason.

Announcer:
This show is produced by the Hartman Media Company, all rights reserved. For distribution or publication rights and media interviews, please visit www.hartmanmedia.com or email [email protected] Nothing on this show should be considered specific personal or professional advice. Please consult an appropriate tax, legal, real estate or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own and the host is acting on behalf of Platinum Properties Investor Network Inc. exclusively.