YW 76 – Grant Cardone

YW 76 – Grant Cardone

On today’s Young Wealth Show, Jason Hartman talks with author, Grant Cardone, about philosophies to live by, getting where you want to be and the importance of who you know. One of Cardone’s latest books, The 10X Rule, poses some interesting points about the fundamental ways in which we go about our daily lives.

Key Takeaways

02.30 – You can totally change your life by living by the mantra: Commit first, figure the rest out later. – Tweet this!

06.00 – Constructing a business plan for a totally new business can simply be a waste of time because there’s no way you could plan for everything that could come up.

07.50 – When it comes to setting targets, you need to push yourself. Setting ‘realistic goals’ often ends up in a loss of excitement for your work. The 10X Rule is about thinking beyond and re-inspiring people.

09.50 – Don’t be put off by ‘ridiculous’. One target can be just as ridiculous as another: why write a business plan for $1 million when you can write one for $10 million?

12.00 – Grant Cardone’s upcoming book deals with issues about the middle class, including whether it even exists. 

15.30 – With both sides crushing the middle class, the only option is to get rich, and you can do it.

16.00 – Never underestimate the power of saying ‘yes’ to things, and where that can take you.

17.30 – Our culture of not taking risks – even of just not talking to strangers – is the riskiest situation we could put ourselves in. What we lose from not taking risks is extensive.

18.00 – If it’s true that your income is the average of the 5 people you spend most time with, you can only expand yourself if you meet new people.

19.45 – The people you know right now won’t change your life. Meet new people, they’ll change your life tomorrow.

21.00 – Make a list of who you need to meet who can change your life.

23.50 – If you’re already kidding yourself about having just a couple of areas of your life being great, stop and make everything great. Make everything 10X.

24.50 – To get what you want, every day you have to do things you don’t want to do. You’ll set yourself apart as being one of the few who does what is necessary to get the job done.

26.30 – Information can be found about Grant Cardone’s work at , www.cardoneuniversity.com, on his YouTube channel, through typing his name into Google, or through following him on Twitter @GrantCardone.

 

Transcript 

Introduction

Welcome to the Young Wealth Show, where you’ll truly learn how to make, spend and invest money for an awesome life. Get the real life stuff that wasn’t part of your school curriculum. Young wealth gives you innovative new ways of dealing with your finances, as well as the skills and tools you’e going to need to survive and be successful out on your own. Let the Young Wealth Show be your GPS to take you from clueless to clued in. Here’s your host, Jason Hartman, with Young Wealth.

Jason:
Hey, it’s my pleasure to welcome Grant Cardone to the Show – you’ve probably heard his name, he’s a New York Times bestselling author, Executive Producer of the reality show, Turnaround King, and the host of the Cardone Zone. He’s author of several books; one of them I just finished, which is entitled The 10X Rule, and he’s coming to us today from Miami beach. Grant, welcome, how’re you doing?

Grant:
Hey Jason, thanks for having me, I’m doing great.

Jason:
Good! It’s good to have you on. Tell us what you’re up to nowadays. What’s keeping you most busy? You’ve got some great books, you’ve got a new book out – Sell Or Be Sold – maybe we’ll talk mostly about The 10X Rule, because I just finished it, but tell us what’s going on.

Grant:
I’m a hustler, and I like to work. I told my wife this weekend ‘I’m sorry I was angry with you this weekend, I just didn’t have enough time..’ Weekends are too long; I like producing, I like doing things, I’m not a big vacation kind of guy or going to so many parties. The long weekends kill me, so I like to produce, I like to work, I like to hustle, I like to make my family proud of me. I’m extremely scared of the economic conditions – not just here in the US but worldwide, and I want to make sure I can provide for them, so I’ve always got this hustle thing going. I’m getting ready to do a project with Steve Harvey, where me and Big Steve go around the country and talk to people about ‘Act Like Success’.

Jason:
Well what does it mean to ‘Act Like Success’? Tell us about that.

Grant:
I think you and I were having a conversation before I got on, and it was like ‘Commit first, figure the rest out later’. That’s been really the theme of my career.

Jason:
I love that.

Grant:
I was 25 years old, I was broke and had no money. I had an education that nobody valued and I was in an economic condition where they weren’t hiring. The wrong time to be broke is when they’re not hiring anybody.

Jason:
Right.

Grant:
And here I came up, broke financially, I was broke spiritually, I didn’t like myself. I was giving up on myself, my family had given up on me, and one day I said ‘Dude, you need to start acting like you’re successful’, because this thing of waiting for the right break, waiting to figure it out, waiting for something to happen, just wasn’t working for me. One day I was selling cars – I was 25 years old and I thought ‘Okay, I hate this job, I hate selling cars, I hate the way people look at me, I’ve got to start acting like I’m successful, right here, right now’, because nobody else was going to give me a job. I was young, immature, acted more confident probably than I was – I still probably do that! And one day I said ‘Okay, every dollar I make, I’m going to reinvest in myself, and I started learning, listening and getting mentors and surrounding myself with success. I started acting successful, and the next thing was my money changed a little bit. When it did change a little bit, it gave me hope that it could change a lot, and then I started liking my job, and I’m like ‘Wow, maybe I could learn this thing’.

Jason:
Yeah, that’s like the self-reinforcing circle – you got into the circle that started reinforcing itself.

Grant:
Yeah, and that’s why you like that ‘Commit first, figure the rest out later’, because everybody’s trying to figure it out. People talk to me and they say ‘Wow, how do you write four books in four years?’ I wrote my first book in three hours, and they’re like ‘How do you write a book in three hours?!’ You sit down and you start writing, that’s what you do. ‘How do you finish a book?’ Most people don’t buy books today because they didn’t finish the last one they bought, and why? You never make a decision when to finish the book. You make a decision to start the book, but you don’t make a decision to finish it. Now, when I buy a book – and I read a lot of books – in the front of it, I’ll put my finish date on it, because I already know my start date (when I opened it). Commit first, and then you figure the rest out later – what it’s going to cost you, how you’re going to do it etc. Most of us don’t know what we’re doing or how we’re going to do it; we just make a decision to do it.

Jason:
Yeah, fantastic. That’s good advice. Grant, talk about this ‘Commit first and figure it out later’. Let’s drill down on that one because I think that’s so meaningful. So many people want to figure it all out beforehand – it’s like okay, let’s write a business plan for this business idea, or for our whole lives, and the fact is nobody can figure it out. You don’t know what’s going to happen along the way; you’ve just got to dive in and do it, right?

Grant:
You’re so right. I just finished creating a digital TV internet website, so a digital station. It’s something that hasn’t been done very much yet. This whole space of digital is like consuming TV and radio, and so we’re in the office right now. I said ‘Hey, when’s this site going to be up?’ They said a month or two, and I asked ‘Have you figured in all the stuff that’s going to go wrong?’ They asked what I meant, so I said ‘We don’t know what we’re doing. We just know we’re going to do it. I own four businesses, all of which do in excess of $10 million a year in sales. They were all started from scratch, and I have never ever written a business plan. Whatever you write down, it might make you feel warm and fuzzy, but look, you don’t even know enough to write the stuff that’s going to work. The things you need to worry about, you don’t even know yet. Spending time on a business plan, about going to different people etc, three months from now, you won’t even be worrying about those things. So many things are going to happen between now and then. I even told my internet department – you can’t plan for malaria or meningitis or whatever; something’s going to happen and nobody plans on all that stuff. I’m with you, man, I’ve never spent any time on a business plan – and look, I’ve done things which were as simple as me going out and making it up as I go, to doing huge real estate deals, where there are hundreds of millions of dollars involved, and still not had a business plan. I knew I had to construct that as I went along, but I had to commit first. Then I could start figuring stuff out after the commitment, as esoteric as that might sound.

Jason:
Everything starts with a commitment, and then from then we iterate and iterate and iterate to get to where we want to go. Yeah, that’s good. Tell us about the 10X Rule in general, if you would, Grant. That’s one of the keys to the 10X Rule, but there are so many. That book is awesome; you have so many entries on the table of Contents, and there’s just a lot to it.

Grant:
Oh, thank you. And you listened to the audio, right? The audio was done about 6 months after the book was finished, and that’s when I was getting a lot of feedback from readers. Anybody that writes a book – if you’ve sold books before, not just written books (a lot of people write them, but very few people sell books) – once you start selling books, that means people are reading them and then you start getting feedback. I waited six months and then recorded this to include the questions people were asking. Like, ‘Hey man, I’ve got it – the 10X Rule, I’m supposed to do 10 times more what I think I’m going to do?’ And I say ‘Yeah, but do you know what that means? Do you know when you’re doing 10 times what’s normal?’, and he’s like ‘No, I don’t’. I say it’s because you’ll immediately have new problems. You want new problems. The 10X Rule is based on a concept that the goals, targets and actions that people are setting are so beneath them, they’re so below and just based on potential. People become unexcited over time about that target, and so you find yourself not having the juice to complete things, or you don’t wake up excited on Day 27, and that’s because I believe the target was too low. Your parents are going to tell you to set realistic goals, and when they say that, you need to ask them, ‘Hey, how’d that work out for you?’

Jason:
Yeah, right.

Grant:
Because to highly successful people – the Carlos Slims, the Bill Gates, the Steve Jobs, the people who are really successful – if you tell them you want to be worth a billion dollars and you’re 17 years old, they’re not going to look at you like you’re weird. They’re not going to say ‘Oh, that’s ridiculous’. If you tell these guys you want to basically cure a disease, they’re not going to say ridiculous. Unfortunately, most people, Jason, are getting advice and feedback from people that don’t dream anymore and don’t have goals. The 10X Rule, as you know, basically re-inspires the individual to think way bigger about their goals, their targets and their actions.

Jason:
Okay, so give us an example of how big should it be? You say that people don’t set their goals high enough, Grant, and so then, they’re kind of moderately excited – they’re not really really juiced. Can a goal be too high? Can it be ridiculous?

Grant:
No, I don’t think so. They’re all ridiculous, man. Beggars on the street corners of LA, and he’s begging for a dollar – completely ridiculous. Why would I stop my car, pull over and give a guy I don’t know $1? It’s not because I don’t have the dollar and it’s not because I’m not generous; it’s because I don’t have the time, dude. I’m rolling through the lights. That’s a ridiculous target. Another guy says ‘I want to make $1 million’. All I’m telling people is this: Whatever your target is – let’s say a financial target, let’s say the target’s a million dollars – I’m like ‘Dude, multiply it times 10’. 10 is that power number. Wherever you go, numbers don’t lie. 10 is a power number. It multiplies things at enormous numbers, and so I’m like ‘Look, rather than writing a business plan for $1 million, why not write one for $10 million?’ ‘Why would I do that?’ ‘They’re both ridiculous, dude, and it’s all crazy. You’re going to be broke no matter which one of these you achieve’. He asks what I mean and I say ‘You get a million dollars, you’re going to feel like a broke man; you get the 10 million dollars, you’re going to feel like a broke man, because your ideas, possibilities and potential changes as you grow up the food chain. When you were 10 years old, you had a different kind of swag than you’re going to hopefully have when you’re 20, and a different one at 30, 40 and so on’. The deal is to stay excited. The people that are most excited are going to win the game, so the 10X Rule just says multiply. You want to make $100 million? Multiply it times 10 and come up with a plan for $1 billion instead, because it’s all work.

Jason:
Awesome. So, okay, there’s this middle class thinking, and you talk about that in the 10X book – about breaking out of the middle class and the incomes of the middle class. Tell us about that?

Grant:
Well I’m starting to allude to another book that I’m working on right now, it’s called basically The Middle Class: Get Out, and it’s about the idea that what your parents, and part of why what people’s think is so small, is because your parents were trying to build a lifetime of what’s called the ‘middle class’ to get in to this class. Particularly in the last 40 or 50 years in America, there’s been a construction of this idea that if I can just get into this club, the middle class, I’m going to be safe. It might be because of good schools for the kids, two cars, you’ve got a house you’ll live in for your whole life, and you can retire, check into your account, and it’s all good, and you can book vacations and live happily ever after. That’s a fantasy, man. This is no different to Cinderella or the 3 Little Bears – I think Goldilocks was involved in that transaction, right? Goldilocks and the 3 Bears is a mythology of the middle class – the real middle class is like this: three bears come home, find Goldilocks, pull her apart, label her for being a thief, kill her right there and have her after the porridge as dessert, and they all laugh about it – ‘Eh, we killed that little white girl, didn’t we?’ So what I’m saying is that the middle class is a myth based on average education, average income, average savings. If everything’s perfect and we don’t live too long, everything’s going to be fine. It’s a myth that has been perpetuated by politics, right and left, Republicans and Democrats to let the masses of people (250 million) know that everything’s alright, you’re better off than the people in Egypt, there’s stability here. It’s just a big propaganda machine. The only place you want to be now is in the upper crust of the middle class – rich or very very wealthy. Everybody else is paying a price; they just can’t tell you that.

Jason:
Well, you know, Grant, especially nowadays, because the middle class in America has been shrinking for quite a few years now. If you look at the stats, working Americans that are working regular J.O.Bs just over broke, they really are just over broke. J.O.B. = job, right? They haven’t really had any increase in real dollar pay in a couple of decades. This is nuts. The middle class is just shrinking, it’s under attack. Lou Dobbs wrote a great book called War on the Middle Class, and I’ve sat that in my seminars for yours – you’d better make a very conscious decision to be above the middle class, because the middle class is leaving you. There’s a girl I used to date, to give you an example – she lives in Newport Beach, her parents leave in Newport Beach, she grew up there and had a nice life. I’d call that upper middle class, even, and she thinks by being a school teacher and just sort of being mediocre and walking through life that she’s going to have that same lifestyle her parents had. They built a bunch of real estate equity over the years and retired playing gold and travelling. She’s just fooling herself – there’s no way that’s going to exist for her when she gets to that age.

Grant:
These are things people need to and want to believe it. It’s like talking about a kid and saying ‘She’s a little girl, she can believe in Santa Claus’, yeah, but sooner or later, the difference between kids and adult is that the kid will find out there’s no Santa Claus. Adults actually don’t know. This white chick that you’re talking about in Orange Country – I know she’s white and I know she votes Republican.

Jason:
Blonde hair and blue eyes.

Grant:
Totally, right? And she’s like ‘Everything’s going to be alright, and when Obama gets out it’ll be alright’. But no it’s not, baby. Both sides are crushing the middle class.

Jason:
Of course they are.

Grant:
Because the middle class doesn’t work. It never worked after the industrial revolution. There’s no expansion in America. We don’t have anything to sell in this country except servicing people, and so the middle class basically is getting shipped overseas. You’ve got to get rich now. I don’t know how to tell people this. I was with Steve Harvey in Atlanta and he asked what my message to people was. It’s ‘Get rich, or you’re going to spend your life crying and thinking ‘Oh, what happened?”. You’ve got get rich now. It’s the only safe haven and anybody can get rich. If you know how to live poor, or just get by (I’ve done both), you can learn how to get rich.

Jason:
Great point, I totally love it. So, habitually commit. You know what I like, Grant, and you’re probably going to like this one too. That movie with Jim Carey, Yes Man. It’s amazing how, when you just say yes to more stuff in life, good things seem to somehow happen.

Grant:
Yeah, totally. Before my mom died, everything I’d ask her to do, she’d always say no first. When you get older, you start getting even more negative, and I think that’s happening earlier and earlier for people today. Say yes, man, say yes and figure it out later! Everybody listening has had the experience of saying yes to your girlfriend, your boyfriend, your family, showing up for some event that you didn’t want to and leaving 3 or 4 hours later, having bitched about it the whole way over there and then on the way home saying ‘You know, I’m really glad you talked me into this’.

Jason:
Yeah, right. ‘I’m glad I got out of the house’ or whatever. So, habitually commit. Does that mean don’t be cautious and just jump in no matter what?

Grant:
I would definitely not be cautious. I’m the most dangerous person in my mind. I think people need to be dangerous. I have two little girls – a 5-year-old and a 3-year-old – and the nanny comes in and says ‘Be careful, Sabrina’ and Sabrina says ‘Papa, Nanny just said to be careful, isn’t she dumb?’ and I say ‘That’s right, baby, we’re dangerous around here. You’re got to be dangerous. You want to be the most dangerous person in your environment’. Cautiousness is actually costing people everything, and this again goes back to the middle class – don’t fly too high, stay low, don’t get too much attention, don’t take too many risks. Not taking risks, today, is actually the riskiest thing you can do. All these ideas that we were taught, like don’t talk to strangers – why? ‘Well, because it’s dangerous’. Why? ‘Well, because that psycho chick, Nancy Grace, on HLN every night talks about somebody that took their wife out and killed them – she’s made hundreds of millions of dollars from terrifying the public. Most people are not pedophiles, okay. I’m not with my kids every second of every day. I had a nightmare the other day that the 3-year-old walked into some traffic and I never found out if she got hit by the car or if she made it to the other side, but I woke up terrified thinking ‘Oh my God, I’m teaching them to be dangerous’, but I’m not going to teach them to stand on the side-walk. I’m not going to teach them that every time they walk across the street they could get hit. It’s just ridiculous. I’m not going to teach my kids that every stranger should be a threat to you, because the truth is, the strangers on this planet have everything you want: your dreams, your ideas. If you’re going to make them possible, it’s because of somebody you don’t yet know. Don’t be cautious – throw the caution to the wind and meet the people you need to meet.

Jason:
Isn’t that a great point you’re making, Grant? I remember hearing the old saying ‘Strangers are just friends you haven’t met yet’ and if you think about it, it goes way back to the late, great Jim Rohn; I’m sure you’re a fan of Jim’s. He said ‘Your income will be the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with’, so how could we possible improve our situation if we don’t go and meet some new people, unless we’re hanging out with billionaires already! We’ve got to go and meet and hang out with some strangers.

Grant:
Yeah, and notice the billionaires: the billionaires are always travelling off somewhere to meet somebody new, because they’re trying to do hook-ups and deals. They say knowledge is power, but that’s not the case. I know too many people with no knowledge. They’ve got power, and the power is in the hook-up, and hook-ups aren’t at your house. I’m not talking about utilities like electrics or water – I’m talking about the hook-ups. The only reason to go to college today is to meet the players. There are only even 4 or 5 colleges worth going to, because that’s where the blue-blood goes, where that old money goes and where the hook-ups are. The difference between a contact and a contract, today, is a relationship. That ‘r’ is the people, man, and the people you know today cannot help you. It’s the people I don’t know. Every day I make a list – who can I meet today. Today I get to meet Jason Hartman. Who do I meet today that can change my life tomorrow? I guarantee you, my friends and the people I had wine or dinner with this weekend will not change my life tomorrow. It’s going to be somebody I don’t yet know.

Jason:
That’s an awesome philosophy. To follow up from that, Grant, what advice do you have for someone who’s sitting here listening to this and thinking ‘That’s true’. The lightbulb’s gone on for them, they go ‘I’ve got to meet some more people and that’s the way I’m going to improve my situation’. How do they decide who they need to meet and how do they approach them? Just any tips you have.

Grant:
What I would do is make a list. Make a list every day of who can help me and my career. I’m a selfish, greedy person. I’ll say it before anybody else says it. I am selfish and I’m greedy and you should be too.

Jason:
No problem there.

Grant:
You should make a list, but you see how we were taught not to be like that?

Jason:
Yeah, I know.

Grant:
Don’t get too much attention either, Jason. You know what? Look at the Kardashians. She’s going to make $200 million off her little apps game that just came out.

Jason:
Unbelievable.

Grant:
Why? Because she gets attention because she’s like ‘Look, this is my life – it ain’t your life – and I’m going to make it into something big.

Jason:
And quit apologizing about it. Just go for it.

Grant:
Exactly. Hate me, everybody hates you but you’ve got a lesson there. I would just tell people ‘Look, make a list every day. Who do you need to meet that would change your life?’ Hopefully my name’s on your list. Hit me up on Twitter @GrantCardone. I’ll respond to you. So make a list every day. Who could I meet today in my community? Maybe they’re in church, maybe they’re in government? Who could you send a letter to, or an email to, or a text to? Who could you tweet today that would change your life tomorrow? Maybe, while you’re out in the market place, meet five strangers. You’re going to find out that they won’t fondle you!

Jason:
Yeah, like ‘Wow, I didn’t get molested when I met a new stranger’.

Grant:
And some of the ladies listening are going to be like ‘I’m hurt and rejected now’, but you’re going to find out that people are scared to death. Just if you walk up to them they’ll think you’re a freaking psycho, because that’s how introverted and small-thinking our culture has become. Everybody just pays attention to their own little thing and then wonder why they don’t get anything. Everything you want is outside your comfort zone. Everything.

Jason:
Yeah, that’s totally awesome, Grant. OKay, pick another favourite concept of yours, whether it be from 10X, or it be from your brand new book..

Grant:
Sex, man!

Jason:
[Laughs] Is that in the book?

Grant:
Could be; 10X!

Jason:
10X! Alright! No, just whatever you want, just to kind of wrap it up.

Grant:
10X condoms! That’d be good, wouldn’t it?

Jason:
I can see a new product launch here.

Grant:
Oh my God, 10X condoms by Grant Cardone! Video and audio included.

Jason:
Yeah, there you go.

Grant:
Think big! I hope your audience can handle all of this.

Jason:
It’s alright, it’s good. Wrap us up with one other great concept from any of your work, any of your books, it doesn’t matter. Maybe if it’s not even published yet?

Grant:
Yeah, I would tell people ‘Look, you’ve got to get a life, man. You’ve got to get so engaged in the deal. You’ve got to get so jacked up; I would just call it the three words. Whatever. It. Takes. I mean, whatever it takes. Jason, what’s the first thing you think of when I say that: whatever it takes?

Jason:
A little part of me says ‘Oh, this is ridiculous, I don’t want to work that hard or I don’t want to sacrifice other areas of my life.’ That’s like the bad conversation that’s going on.

Grant:
Yeah, yeah, or people will say ‘Oh yeah, but I’m not going to be unethical’. I’m not talking about being unethical.

Jason:
Yeah, that’s another good point.

Grant:
Most people already don’t have the life they want. People always tell me that – ‘Man, if I go all out on this I’m not going to get back this part of my life’. ‘Dude, you’re already unhappy in that part of your life; why are you kidding yourself?’ There are 7 billion people who’ll line up and lie to you. Don’t be in your own lie. Get honest. Nobody is doing whatever it takes to get the life they want, and it’s worth it. Whatever it takes. By the way, I’m not going to have part of a life. I want everything to be 10X. I want my finances to be 10X, I want my wife and my marriage to be 10X, I want to be 10X as a parent. I want to have it great in every area, not just one or two. I’m going to do whatever it takes. 9 out of 10 things I do, on a daily basis, I don’t want to do. Most of the things that I do every day, I do not want to do. I was telling Steve Harvey this the other day. Steve’s got 3 hours of radio every day. He does 4 or 5 hours every day of Family Feud. He hadn’t been home in like 3 years, hadn’t eaten breakfast in his home. I asked him ‘How many things do you do per day that you don’t want to do?’ and he looked at me and said ‘Oh my God, I’m glad I’ve finally met someone that understands’. Every day, no matter where you’re at, you have to be willing to do whatever it takes. That includes the stuff you don’t want to do. I know you know this. These ideas of just doing what you love, and then success will show up can’t work. You’ve got to be willing to do a lot of stuff you don’t love, you don’t want to do and you hate to do if you really want success. That’s what I would tell people to do.

Jason:
That’s a great thing, and it’s funny how you’ll learn to be okay with, and actually sometimes love, or at least delegate the things you don’t want to do. They’re really not that hard, once you dive in and do them.

Grant:
First of all, the market place is going to see you as a unique individual and they’re going to start valuing you. They’re going to start paying you more than you think you’re worth, and you’re going to start getting breaks that other people don’t get, and this commodity and this idea that you’d do whatever it takes – show up early, stay late, make the extra call, go out and do the things you’re uncomfortable doing. It is a rare breed of people that are willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done.

Jason:
Hey, Grant, give our your different websites. I know you’ve even got a great iPhone app that I downloaded. Give any of your stuff so people can find you and find out all about you.

Grant:
If you Google ‘Grant Cardone’, you can find out everything about me. There’s a great site right now with a free video download called ‘Tired of Missing Sales’ for , for organisations and sales people, and there’s also a university called www.cardoneuniversity.com, for anybody that wants help branding, marketing, sales, negotiating etc. If you want help getting more money, head to this site too. We’ve got 1100 videos on YouTube, go to YouTube and throw my name in there. Twitter: I have it up all day long. They’re about to ban me on Twitter, I think. I’m not hard to find, man.

Jason:
Alright, awesome. Grant Cardone, thank you so much. Much success to you, and that’s really inspiring stuff. Keep up the great work.

Grant:
Thanks a lot, Jason.

Outro:
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