YW 75 – Website Conversion with Dmitry Kozlov

YW 75 – Website Conversion with Dmitry Kozlov

Dmitry Kozlov, founder and CEO of Purpose Inspired Marketing, is Jason Hartman’s guest today on the Young Wealth Show. With topics for discussion ranging from colour perception and its influence on website conversion to creating opportunities for the technological youth of today, this episode will open the eyes of many listeners to website design elements they may never have considered.

Key Takeaways

03.00 – A lot of advanced web design deals with people’s perceptions associated with graphics, such as colour representation.

04.20 – The influence of Zappos CEO, Tony Hsieh, seems to know no bounds, even to the level of using his home for business dealings.

05.50 – Live chat or Active Engage options are fast becoming one of the most important tools, especially in e-commerce industries. Companies such as AppSumo are pioneering the trend.

08.35 – Your website’s use of pop-ups can be improved by first posing a yes/no question in a pop-up and then leading to the chance to enter a name and email address, rather than immediately asking for these personal details.

11.30 – For your calls to action to be successful, you have to find a balance between the nurturing side and the business side. That way if one isn’t working for the client, you have the other to fall back on to reassure them.

12.35 – In terms of visual website optimisation, split-testing gives you so much scope for making individual changes to your site and monitoring visitors’ response to it. Hello Bar is one example of an available split-testing tool. In some tests, green has come out as the least successful colours for conversion.

16.50 – When it comes to outsourcing, especially off-shore, you’re hiring process should be as rigorous as it is for any other aspect of your business.

20.30 – www.onlinejobs.ph and www.easyoutsource.com are both highly recommended websites for off-shore outsourcing in the Philippines.

21.50 – When judging how much to pay your employees, you can look at their standard rates and compare those with what other posts are offering. Then you can decide whether to increase or stay the same.

25.30 – Having some technology-based tools like Base Camp (for projects) and Time Doctor (for time tracking) had really make the difference as your project and your team grows

28.00 – Technological advances and their availability mean that the geniuses and business growers of today’s society are able to have these transformations at an earlier age.

30.00 – The costs of membership to with www.mavericknext.com are as necessary to provide the service they offer – focusing on the provision of high-level mentors and strategies for personal success.

32.00 – Visit www.mavericknext.com, www.visiontechteam.com or www.jasonhartman.com for more information on the topics discussed.

Transcript

Introduction:
Speakers, publishers, consultants, coaches and informarketers, unite. The Speaking of Wealth Show is your roadmap to success and significance. Learn the latest tools, technologies and tactics to get more bookings, sell more products and attract more clients. If you’re looking to increase your direct response sales, create a big-time personal brand and become the go-to guru, the Speaking of Wealth Show is for you. Here’s your host, Jason Hartman.

Jason:
Hey, it’s my pleasure to welcome Dmitry Kozlov to the show, he is founder and CEO at Purpose Inspired Marketing, and I guess it’s also fair to say that he is the founder of Next, which is a great group. You’ll hear some more about it in this interview. Dmitry has done some web development work for one of my companies and he has a lot of expertise in the areas of conversion and outsourcing, and we’re going to talk to him about both of those things today. Dmitry, welcome, how are you?

Dmitry:
I am excellent, how are you, Jason?

Jason:
Good, it’s good to have you on the show. You’re coming to us from today from my home town, Orange County, California, but you are based in Austin, Texas, is that correct?

Dmitry:
Yeah, that is correct. I’m pretty nomadic so currently in California, then I’ll go back to Austin and then I’m travelling around for a bit.

Jason:
Good stuff, well that’s one of the opportunities that technology and the digital lifestyle offers us. We can be kind of nomadic, and it’s a great freedom to have, it really is. Let’s dive in first and talk about this: you did some masterminding with Tony Hsieh of Zappos and you did some great stuff with him in the area of conversion. When I say that, it’s web-design and converting leads. Let’s talk about that first, and then let’s talk about some of this other stuff too.

Dmitry:
Sure, just to clarify there, we had a good number of entrepreneurs that got together at Tony Hsieh’s house. He would sit and mastermind with us, and we talked about a lot of different things from psychology to a lot of financial stuff, from a higher-level entrepreneurship perspective, and then I was there with the web-design expert and shared some fun stuff. I would say that the biggest points that really came out of it are some of the things that I can share here today. It was really focused on how to increase engagement and conversions on your website, using some of the various tools that are out there or actually using the design of the site to do this. Firstly, I’ll dive a little bit into the design. So on the design piece, one of the most critical parts in designing a site for conversions is really understanding how your audience can be attracted with various colours on the site. There are general psychological principles for colour as far as what buttons to use in what cases, and the idea that red means passion, but it also means stop, and oftentimes it’s actually not a good call-to-action colour. Something like yellow or orange seems more like igniting an actual action. There’s a lot that goes into that. I could obviously provide that as a resource to everybody on the show and give a little colour chart of what does what, or if you want, I could dive into it for a few minutes, it’s totally up to you.

Jason:
You know what, we’ll set up a link for this on the website in the show notes for you, but that’s great. Yeah, red meaning passion, anger, vigour. Black meaning fear, secrecy. Yellow meaning knowledge, energy, joy. Purple meaning royalty, wisdom, spirituality, imagination. Green for fertility, wealth, healing, success, growth. So that’s good, but yeah, I know there’s more to it and I’ve just got to say, Dmitry, before you dive in too far, I had the opportunity with you to go to Tony Hsieh’s house in Las Vegas and he lives in a high-rise condo. It’s pretty cool. His place is like a really cool, very innovative .. – I want to call it a facility rather than a home.

Dmitry:
Yeah, and it’s amazing because it’s his personal home, but he just lets people in there for the inspiration, or to give tours and to really share openly what they’re doing with the company.

Jason:
Yeah, it’s really awesome. You can tell why he’s such an innovative guy. It’s like he just lives in an idea factory, which I just love. That’s great. I didn’t go to this mastermind, which you did, and that’s fantastic. The colour thing is definitely important. Beyond colour, tell us more.

Dmitry:
Absolutely, so there are a number of tools that are recommended there – one of which is live chat, or Active Engage. This is something that you see a lot of bigger companies using on their e-commerce sites or on a check-out process, which a lot of small businesses really miss out on. Really, everybody can implement their live chat WordPress plug-ins for free, there are tools out there which offer a software or a service for $20-40 per month. Using something like that, or even an Active Engage pop-up, which means that somebody doesn’t have to be sitting there live available to talk to your customers, but there could be something that pops up 30 seconds or a minute into the site that says ‘Hey, got a question? Drop your question here’, and what you’re actually doing is capturing leads. You’re capturing an email address, but you’re doing it in a way where you’re really engaging with somebody. You can find service firms especially can do this. Really, anybody who is selling anything online can do this, but especially the service world, where there are usually a few questions that have to get answered before somebody makes the decision to do business with you. That piece alone can often be more effective than a Buy button, than a consultation button or a contact button on your site to drive conversions. It’s something super easy to implement, but that a lot of people just miss.

Jason:
Sure, I agree, that’s fantastic. Now, Dmitry, what company do you like the best for that Active Engage – is that the name of the company?

Dmitry:
Active Engage is more like the whole concept – there might be a name for that. There’s a bunch of them, and maybe what I’ll do is make a list of recommendations that you can put on the show with some links. Actually, when I did this masterminding, I listed a few of them and now I’ve found some better ones – exact links don’t come to mind now.

Jason:
Okay, fantastic. I know that with my own web-surfing habits, I don’t use those very much, although I do think they’re a good idea and I think it’s a good idea to put them on sites. Personally, I don’t use them so much because I don’t want to spend a bunch of time typing with a sort of unqualified person that doesn’t really know that much about it. These are just general – I don’t want to say call-centres, because they’re not call-centres, but they’re almost engagement centres, or chat-log centres – what are your thoughts about that?

Dmitry:
Right, well it depends. I’ll use the big company AppSumo as an example, and they have a really strong active engagement scene on their course on how to build your thousand dollar business, which they sell to people.

Jason:
Yeah, we had Noah Kagan on the show, by the way.

Dmitry:
Awesome, so if you go to Noah’s sales page, it’s a real human being who pops up on the page and wants to talk to you. You’d be surprised  – it actually used to be that a good percentage of the time, that person actually was Noah.

Jason:
He would; that sounds just like him.

Dmitry:
He would actually sit there and do that. Or it would be somebody that’s a close employee in his company.

Jason:
Yeah, he’d probably start a conversation about tacos.

Dmitry:
Right, and the thing is, why not? Even as the company owner, the sales person, or even if you just leave that to be answered, there’s no better time to ask to do business with somebody or ask if you can help somebody than when they’re actually exploring your website, before they move on to the next thing, and if you can make that person feel engaged before they leave to do more research on what other vendors they might look at, or what other e-commerce products are available – they’re doing their research. If you can stop them along the way when they’re doing their research and help them out or answer any questions for them, you can stop the process right there and convert that person, versus them doing it based on a tonne of research and their own actions.

Jason: 
Okay, good. What about pop-ups?

Dmitry:
Yeah, so pop-ups are big, and there are different ways of doing them. There’s this plug-in called PopUp Domination, which is the best one for the actual implementation piece here, but really just like any offer, with pop-ups you want to give a lot of value. One of the things that works really well now, firstly not having a pop-up right away: waiting until they’ve been on the site for at least about 30 seconds, or when they go to another page other than the homepage and having something pop up there. One of the big things that’s happening now that was discussed in the Mastermind is this kind of yes/no thing – so something pops up and instead of saying ‘Enter your name and email address for my free eBook’, it says ‘Are you interested in XYZ?’ There’s a site called Quick Sprout, which is a really good example. It basically says ‘Are you interested in increasing you site’s traffic?’

Jason:
What was the website?

Dmitry:
QuickSprout.com. It’s a guy called Neil Patel that has that site. If you go and spend about a minute on there, something will pop up and the service is called Bounce Exchange, but really you can do the same thing with a plug-in. Right now it says ‘Yes, send me the free traffic generation guide’, or it says ‘No, I have enough traffic’, and you click the yes button, and it’s going to drive me to an opt-in. Rather than being asked to enter my name and email address right away, it actually asks me a question where the obvious answer to that question for that target audience is yes. Then the result is that I’ve already made the decision to opt in, so by the time I see the name and email, I’m already psychologically prepared for it and it’ll convert a tonne better than just popping up with ‘Hey, enter your name and email address for a free eBook’, and you can apply that same concept even without a pop-up, so on a side-bar, you can have a button that says ‘Download this free rapport’ and then having it pop-up and say ‘Enter your email here’. That works a lot better than saying straight away ‘Download this free rapport: enter your email here’ all on the side-bar because you’re giving somebody multi-step decisions.

Jason:
Right, so it’s better to give them more choices, you’re saying?

Dmitry:
Well, no, it’s better to make their choices easier. So instead of saying there’s a side-bar which says ‘Subscribe here, enter your name and email and download this free eBook’, you just have a button on your site which says ‘Download this free eBook’, so now somebody’s made the decision to download, which is easier for them than to make the decision to opt in. By the time they make the decision to download, now the thing pops up and says ‘Okay, now you have to opt in with your name and email too to download this’. By the time you’re seeing that pop-up, you’re already psychologically committed to getting what you want because you’ve already clicked the download button.

Jason:
Got it.

Dmitry:
That’s versus having to, at the same time, thinking ‘Do I want this?’ and ‘Do I want to give them my name and email?’

Jason:
Yeah, it makes sense. Alright, what’s next?

Dmitry:
Yeah, so on the point of calls to action. In general, there are two major categories of calls to action that you can have on your website, and those two really go into ‘Do business with me’, which might be scheduling a session, buying a product, fill out a consultation form, whatever it might be. The second one is to nurture – this seems obvious, but you’d be surprised how many sites are just missing both or at least one of these. They can really scream ‘Do business with us!’, but they’re not nurturing. Or they’re doing a lot of nurturing and saying ‘Opt in, opt in, opt in’, but they’re not really asking for the sales, so doing a fine balance of those two, and then especially – let’s say someone isn’t ready to do business – it’s about driving them back to the nurture and then making sure that the nurturing opt-in allows people to then do business with you once they’re ready.

Jason:
Makes sense. OKay, good point. These are just missed opportunities that have virtually no marginal cost to implement, and they can increase sales quite dramatically.

Dmitry:
Yeah, absolutely.

Jason:
We talked about nurture – do you like visual website optimiser?

Dmitry:
Love it.

Jason:
Okay, tell us why.

Dmitry:
So I’m a huge fan of split-testing – I still believe you should use your brain and you should get an idea of what your customers want, but at the same time, split-testing can be this incredible tool that just makes all of your decisions so much easier, especially if you have the right kind of traffic. When I say that, I mean anything more than around 1000 visitors per month, which is a situation where you can really start split-testing and getting value out of it. It’s pretty easy to do – it’s not this massively complex technical process. You just get a visual website optimiser account; they have some tutorials and they can walk you through it from a technical aspect or you can hire someone to do that for you, and then there are so many things you can split-test. Instead of deciding ‘Oh well, I’ve heard that an orange BUY button does better than a green one, but my brand is green and blah blah blah’, just put up a split-test, and once you have enough traffic it’ll actually tell you the percentage of people opting in or buying more with this button versus this one, or this headline versus this one. Or you can do that for the entire site with site design. Let’s say you wanted to get your whole site revamped, but you’re afraid that it might hurt the conversions because your customers aren’t used to it. One of the things you can start doing is adjusting parts of your site and seeing how that affects it. Maybe just the background colour, the heading and the style of opt-in you have, and then you start measuring that site on a split-test versus your old site, and just seeing which one people respond to better in terms of conversion.

Jason:
Yeah, it’s very revealing.

Dmitry:
And you can keep making those incremental changes as long as they’re improving conversions, rather than doing a giant site overhaul.

Jason:
That makes sense, that’s great. The split-testing thing is very revealing. I just did a small one recently with Hello Bar, which I think is a nice tool. It was just amazing to me, Dmitry, I tested the exact same offer with, I think, three different colours: blue, green and a reddish-orangish colour, and the green did not convert at all! Literally, zero, amazingly.

Dmitry:
Right, so imagine if you didn’t split-test and you’d just put a green bar up there, you’d say ‘Oh, this green bar doesn’t work’.

Jason:
And that’s exactly what I would have got, so split-testing is a critical thing. It’s a very very good thing to be a fan of. OKay, you’ve got some other tools in terms of design, right?

Dmitry:
Yeah, there’s really a whole tonne of stuff. One of the things I always talk about is just conceptually to really make your design. I try to make design immersive, so if you have budget for a good designer, you should really have the designer and the copyrighter of your site work well together so that the copy of your site matches the copy, and so the design falls back into the copy. That’s especially important on a sales page, or any page where you want somebody to take action, because you want those two concepts to be really married well to each other. So that’s a big conceptual thing. If you’re selling an event or an experience at a restaurant, if you’re a small business owner etc. there are so many ways that, through photography, through the right colours and imagery, through the right arrangement of copies, you can start to get people to understand the experience they’re going to have by getting your product. That’s definitely a big piece. In terms of the tools, I’m also happy to put up a link for you guys of a tonne of stuff that we recommend.

Jason:
Yeah, we’ll do that because there’s just an endless number of tools as we all know, Dmitry. It’s just mind boggling how big the world of tools is, and it’s a great thing, no question about it. Some of it comes down to getting some help at doing this, and having people that can help you do this kind of thing and can just implement it and roll it out for you. One of the things you’ve been incredibly good at, and I know I have tried it myself and I have to say, I have not been good at it, is outsourcing, and off-shore outsourcing especially, to the Philippines. Tell us a little bit about why you think that’s worked for you, and I’m sure you know other people who it hasn’t worked well for. What’s your secret to success there?

Dmitry:
Sure, so I would say that for me, the secret there is just treating it just like if I were hiring regular virtual employees, but also being very culture-aware as I’m doing that. What I mean is that for a lot of people that don’t have success in outsourcing – their problem is that they hire an employee and they act like they’re a hiring agency, and they say ‘Well, I said I wanted this, this and this done, and we need you to do it properly, based on the level of expertise you’re supposed to have’, and then a lot of people hire an outsourcer just by looking at a jobsite and saying ‘Oh, this guy says he does XYZ, therefore I’ll hire him and he can start tomorrow’. Imagine you’re running your company, you’re in Phoenix, and you take some guy off the street that tells you ‘Oh, I can do this, this and this’, and you start paying him $50,000 a year the next day to work for you. It’ll probably be a disaster. You’d normally put that person through an interview process, interview them 3 or 4 times with different parties involved. You’d contact their references, you’d put them through some test projects, and then you would pay that person $50,000 a year to do that job. The chances are, you’d go through 50 of those people before you hired the right person. So I apply the same thing with outsourcing; I have a very strong hiring process, so putting together a job that talks about your company culture, talks about the level of experience you’re looking for. I have very specific instructions in my job post – it’s a very long post, and about 3/4 of the way down I give an application instruction, and I say ‘Email me with this subject line, explaining this’. It can be why you think you’d do a good job for our company, your skills on a level of 1-10 on the following areas and then whatever I’m hiring for I’ll put those skills there, and a couple of other things that I typically look for in an initial application. If somebody sends me an app, and this happens all the time – if they send me an app and they don’t have the right subject line, I don’t read the app because they clearly can’t follow instructions, right? So I have this filtration process, where I get 40-50 applicants for one potential job and I’ll interview probably 4 or 5. The great thing is that for out-sourcing your costs are relatively minimal for hourly work, so say you’re looking to hire a developer full-time, the first thing I do is for about a week, I give them hourly tasks. I have 3-5 people working on some similar projects, and then I get to feel them out and see how they work and whether they fit into our company’s core values, and whether they follow through. Based on that, I will hire 1 or 2. So just like you would in the US, or anywhere else, it’s just a matter of having a great hiring process, a great training process and great onboarding processes for those employees. You really want to treat them just like they’re full-time employees, rather than thinking of it as this international out-sourcing. That’s especially relevant if you’re hiring people on board, not through some agency, not through a recruiting centre, but if you really want your own dedicated team that’s going to kick ass for you for the next 5 years while they’re in your company.

Jason:
Yeah, I love it. Those are some great tips, Dmitry. They’re excellent tips. Firstly, how do you find them? Those are great tips for once you’ve found your candidates, but how do you find them, and more importantly, how do you decide what to pay them? Do you use bonuses as well?

Dmitry:
Absolutely. Firstly, the finding question. There are two sites that I primarily use, and one is www.onlinejobs.ph, which is a really awesome site.

Jason:
And these are for the Philippines, right?

Dmitry:
Yeah, exactly, this is specifically Philippino. There are two sites – one is www.easyoutsource.com, which is like the Craigslist of the Philippino job market, and then the other was www.onlinejobs.ph, which is premium. It costs the employer $50/month, and it’s more like the monster.com for the Philippine job market. Then I have very detailed job postings on there; sometimes I’ll pay to do a sponsored job listing on the free site, and then you just really want to get it out there, do some good keywords to make sure that you’re getting good employees, and then I take applicants from there. That’s where I mostly get them. What was the second part of this question?

Jason:
How do you decide what to pay them?

Dmitry:
Okay, got it, so compensation. For most positions, there’s a lot of standard compensations. In the Philippines you can hire someone full-time for $300/month, and you can hire someone full-time for $2000/month, depending on their varying skill-sets. The best way to do it, depending on what you’re looking for – let’s say it’s web design and you’re looking for a particular skill set, that could be design, video editing etc. I would look for what the other job postings are offering, and then on the flip-side, you can look at potential applicants and look at their profiles, and oftentimes they’ll show their rate, or what they typically work for on there. I take that and increase it by making 10-20%.

Jason:
So you pay extra?

Dmitry:
Yeah, I pay extra, and then I increase it on the job posting so that I can make sure I get premium quality applicants, because your best potential employees aren’t going to apply for mediocre or lower-paying jobs, but they are going to apply for a really well-written post that offers a higher salary with the potential for promotion. That promotion is big, so I’ll hire people at a good rate, and then I’ll very quickly (in the first couple of months), give them an opportunity to prove themselves, make more money through raises, and then make more money through bonuses.

Jason:
Right, okay, so what kind of rates are you talking about? Are you paying $10/day, $10/hour? Give us some idea.

Dmitry:
Sure, I would say a good developer on my team makes about $800/month.

Jason:
For web development?

Dmitry:
Yeah. So that’s the equivalent of a full-time job at $5 an hour. We have people that get paid less, and we have people that get paid more, but that’s a pretty good rough range, right? The same thing with my senior designer. My junior designer makes less than that, and then as we go, we’re going to increase this, and now we’re looking for people that are much more higher-level programmers, which might be literally even double that rate. Still, it’s very much worth it because that same person in the US is worth $70,000 or $80,000 a year, if you find the same kind of skill-set.

Jason:
No question about it. So pay extra. Are you always hiring full-time people? You used some key words like salary, you said $800/month. Most people, when they’re out-sourcing, are using tools like ODesk or Elance, which is now the same company, by the way, they merged, and they’re being hired for a specific task or an odd job.

Dmitry:
Right. That’s definitely possible in the Philippines too, but what I would say is for the Philippines, you’ll get the most success hiring people full-time, on a committed position. You can usually have a huge say in that, so Odesk and Elance are great for ‘Hey, I need this thing fixed’ or ‘I need this little project or one-time thing done’. The Philippines aren’t so great for your one-time projects – they can be okay – but they really kick ass for finding long-term employees at rates that you can easily justify paying a full-time salary for. Again $800/month to a talented developer in the Philippines is like you can pay some High School kid the same amount of money for a part-time job in your company, maybe an intern. So for most people, even if you have a small business and you don’t do that much web stuff, it might still justify having somebody part-time on a pay roll with good skills for $400-500/month.

Jason:
Good, makes sense. Do you use any particular technology-based tools to track their work, for billing etc?

Dmitry:
Oh yeah, absolutely. So I’m happy to put these in the list as well. I’m obsessed with Base Camp for project management – I have 40+ projects in there right now that are active, and that my life would be absolutely insane without that tool. I’m managing over a dozen people with it, so that to me is the best project management tool. There are others out there, like Trello, DeskAway, but my team and I believe Base Camp’s the best, and then I integrate Base Camp with something called Tickspot, and that’s where my employees do time tracking and it goes directly with the Base Camp tasks that I give them. For an agency, that’s what makes the most sense to me. If somebody’s hiring just one person and they just want that person to track the time to make sure that they’re not goofing off, there’s something called Time Doctor, which is also really good – and it also takes screenshots of the person’s screen every 10 minutes or every hour, whatever you set it to.

Jason:
Just like Odesk, so you don’t need to go and pay an Odesk premium, you can use Time Doctor.

Dmitry:
Yeah, exactly, with Time Doctor, I think there’s a built-in tool that’s similar which comes with www.onlinejobs.ph or Time Doctor in itself is probably about $30. I don’t really know the details around it, but it’s definitely worth it to put something like that together, so yeah, for management: Base Camp, for time tracking: Tickspot or Time Doctor. I use QuickBooks Online for billing and everything like that, but if somebody’s just starting off in a services role, that’s not as necessary – although it is super useful.

Jason:
Right, great. Good advice – I can see why you’ve really mastered the outsourcing thing and I hear so many other entrepreneurs  – myself included – complain about it: how they’ve tried it and it just didn’t really work out, but you’ve done some good things to really make that work, so congratulations to you. Tell us about Next. You’re heading up a great group that Yanik Silver started, and it’s called Next, and I’m in the Maverick, that is also one of his groups, but you’re doing a great job with it Dmitry. I’ve got to just compliment you on that; you’re very passionate about young entrepreneurship and you’re just building a great group. Tell us about it.

Dmitry:
Absolutely. So first thing is I’ll take a quick step back. So with everything we talked about today, the really cool thing about all of these things using all the different tech tools, using outsourcing and building a virtual company – the really awesome thing about all of this stuff now is living in the world we live in right now – a 6-year old kid in his mother’s basement can do all this stuff. He can just set up a WordPress site, hire an outsourcer and he can implement tools to convert better to sell online. Because of that, we’re seeing this big surge in entrepreneurship where it wasn’t necessarily possible or nearly as possible a few decades ago for somebody in High School to start not just a little side business, but an actual enterprise. Right now, that’s become more and more relevant. If you look throughout history , some of the greatest entrepreneurs and inventors and just human beings in general, have had some of the greatest transformations before the age of 25. That’s one of the reasons we focus on this 25-and-under group, but what’s really cool now is that those aren’t going to be the rare Steve Jobs or Isaac Newtons or whatever, that have their early age transformations, This is going to be a standard where the geniuses of the world, or anybody who’s going to create something significant, most of them are starting really young. One of the things we really focus on with Next is finding those people that have the drive and have already proven that they can do something – a minimum for that is that they’ve built a six-figure company or they’re doing something pretty significant for their age. It’s then important to link them up to the other missing piece to success beyond the tools and the environment, which is having the right kind of mentors and peer network. That’s why we link them up with you guys as Mavericks, and with the other Next members for that group empowerment and give them really awesome experiences so they not only create some really significant success a lot earlier on, and hit that inflection point, but also have a lot more joy in the moment in creating their youth in those memories in a way that’s really meaningful.

Jason:
Yeah, absolutely. Well, you’re doing a great job with it. Do you care to say how it works or talk about how people join Next, or what it costs etc?

Dmitry:
Sure, so the costs, depending on when someone’s listening to the show, might fluctuate a bit, so if you go through the regular application process you’ll see those, but the bottom line is that we charge enough to keep the lights on, because the real focus of it is much bigger than what we’re doing with the membership fees. We feel like empowering the next generation is going to have a much bigger profit gain for us that anything we do short-term. As far as the application process, just go to www.mavericknext.com, there’s a quick pre-app on there, which we then review and we get to know you a little bit based on that, and then I’ll send a personal email basically saying ‘Okay, you’re invited’ or ‘Hey, you might want to wait a few months or a year, when your business gets to the next level, and then we’ll invite you’, and then we send an invite, somebody reads through all the program details, all the events that come with membership, the access to high-level mentors and everything that you get, and they make a decision on submitting a full application. Based on that full application, we have a call and typically, if you’re the right kind of person, we invite you in to join and our network grows by one awesome new entrepreneur that gets to impact the rest of the group.

Jason:
That’s awesome, fantastic. Well, Dmitry, give out your website or any websites you want to give out for people.

Dmitry:
So, one of the things I do – and this is where most of my revenue has come from, and I’m 25, as well, so have a huge passion for the 25 and under group – is an agency I built when I started at college and that I still run now. We’ve recently renamed that Vision Tech Team, so one of our sites is www.visiontechteam.com, and then the other main site is www.mavericknext.com, so that’s where all the entrepreneur stuff is and the pre-app is.

Jason:
Fantastic. Well, Dmitry Kozlov, thank you so much for joining us today, and you are a real inspiration. Keep up the good work.

Dmitry:
Awesome, thank you, Jason, really appreciate everything you do with the show and definitely appreciate you having me on. Thank you.

Outro:
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