We recently discussed the large bite that dining out can take from your budget but it doesn’t stop there. Oh no, not even close. Take a look at the following budget busters and think about changing them too. 1. Smoking: Coffin nails cost the serious smoker about $1,600 yearly. Not to mention turning your lungs the consistency of the track at Daytona after a long day of racing. If you want to ever be taken seriously as a thinking human being, give up this habit. 2. Drop the pop: We talked about this one already. Daily liquid sugar overdoses are about as good for your immune system as smoking is for your lungs. Have you noticed how expensive pop drinks are at your favorite fast food franchise? 3. Lattes: This fancy caffeine injections costs about $4. Is this a good business decision for the young wealth builder? We say no. 4. Turn off electronics: Ignore the computer geeks. It saves noticeable money to switch off the gadgets before going to bed or when you’re gone. Opt for energy star models when you can. 5. Television: Do you really watch all those extra channels in the nose bleed subscription and, if so, should you? Go with the basic package or, better yet, none at all. Crack a book and find some real entertainment. Seriously, you won’t die if the television is off. That’s probably about all the budget busting a person can be expected to handle in one sitting but we’re not done yet. Come back tomorrow, if you dare, for five more habits that are killing your budget. The Young Wealth Team

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